Saturday, February 8, 2020

Performance Management - Assessment item 1 (Essay) Essay

Performance Management - Assessment item 1 ( ) - Essay Example Performance appraisals are used to determine the quality of performance of each employee in his job. An idea as to those who have talent or need training and those who may be promoted, demoted, retained, or fired will be obtained. The transitional differences in organizations over the recent years have influenced the performance appraisal systems too to accommodate larger business opportunities and priority in the aims (Sonnentag, 2002, p. 115). Sonnentag has described performance appraisal as a â€Å"generic term covering a variety of processes whereby an individual’s work performance is assessed, usually by that person’s line manager and discussed with a view to solving problems, improving performance and developing the individual appraised† (2002, p.116). He has detailed three perspectives contributing to employee performance: the individual, situational and performance regulation. The behavior, motivational personality and the interpersonal relationships of the employees play a role in the success of the appraisal systems. The appraisal would materialize based on the organizational politics and conflict avoidance of the appraiser, the appraisee’s behavior and the relationship between the two parties. The appraisee’s differences in behavior change his views on the â€Å"need for achievement, goal orientation, self awareness and self efficacy, self esteem, locus of control and feedback attitudes† (Sonnentag, 2002, p. 115). His performance level would depend much on his personality and mental make-up, the situational aspect where events may facilitate or obstruct his functional performance and the organizational performance regulations of goal setting (Sonnentag, 2002, p. 8). â€Å"declarative knowledge, procedural knowledge and skills and lastly motivation† (1990). Campbell’s model was considered proficient. The

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Why hunting is possitive Essay Example for Free

Why hunting is possitive Essay The human being has been hunting ever since time began. It was the only way of life back then. A hunter was either successful and survived or not successful and died. Hunting is still a way of survival for some people. There are many anti-hunting activists out there trying to bring down hunting. They say that it is cruel and mean to kill a defenseless animal. What they don’t understand is that if we didn’t hunt, the world would be completely different. Hunting has many positive effects on not only the environment but also the economy and people’s life. When people think of the most dangerous animal in North America they think of bears and sharks. There have only been 28 deadly bear attacks and 10 deadly shark attacks in the past 10 years (Rice, 2011). The most dangerous animal may well be the deer. There are nearly 32 million deer alive today (25 Reasons, 2013). With roads and highways going through areas that are heavily populated by deer, more than 1 million car accidents are caused by dear per year. Due to those 1 million car accidents, there is $1 billion in vehicle damage, 200 deaths and 10,000 personal injures per year (Rice, 2011). Hunting lowers the risk of a driver hitting a deer. For every deer hit by a car, hunters kill 6 (25 Reasons, 2013). When a hunter kills a deer they take away the chance of that deer getting hit by a car. If we didn’t hunt, those numbers of vehicle accidents caused by deer would go up dramatically because the population would be higher. Hunting is also a method of conservation as it keeps the population of animals down, keeping them compatible with human activity. Hunters not only help wildlife conservation by keeping the population down but also by purchasing the weapons and ammunition. In 1937 hunters requested an 11% tax on weapons and ammunition by introducing the Pittman-Robertson Act. The tax from this Act generates $371 million dollars a year (25 Reasons, 2013). In just state licenses and fees alone, hunters generate $769 million a year for conservation programs (25 Reasons, 2013). Altogether including donations hunters pay more than $1. 6 billion dollars for conservation (25 Reasons, 2013). The money goes to conservationist across the country (Hunting and Wildlife, 2012). The land area and the number of licenses in that area is what decide where the money gets  distributed (Hunting and Wildlife, 2012). The money supports conservation efforts by the department of natural resources such as conducting research, wildlife reintroductions, and improving wildlife habitat. Hunting conservation not only keeps the population of animals down, but it can also help bring the numbers of endangered animals up. Hunting regulations and conservation efforts have brought many species’ populations from few numbers to many. In 1907 only 41,000 elk remained in North America, now there are more than 1 million. In 1900 there were only 500,000 whitetail deer and  only 100,000 wild turkeys, now there are more than 32 million whitetail and 7 million wild turkeys (25 Reasons, 2013). Also many non-hunted animals benefit off the conservation efforts that hunters provide (25 Reasons, 2013). These animals were able to make a rebound in their numbers by the conservation efforts. These efforts include the conservationist protecting the land and making untouchable areas. President Theodor Roosevelt was an avid hunter and conservationist. He created 230 million acres of protected forest and wetlands for wildlife (25 Reasons, 2013). Hunting has a major impact on the economy. There are a total of 15. 5 million hunters over the age of six in the United States of America (Fueling, 2013). When a person goes hunting they have to have gear to hunt. Hunters also sometimes travel to go hunt, whether it is in a different state or just down the road. The purchase of the gear and travel has an impact on the American economy. In 2011 American hunters spent $38. 3 billion dollars in hunting equipment and travel expenses. That is more than the revenue of Comcast for that same year (Fueling, 2013). Travelers spent $10. 4 billion on trip related expenses in 2011 (Fueling, 2013). The total amount of money spent on gear in 2011 was $27. 9 billion (Fueling, 2013). Duck and geese hunters use decoys and calls when they hunt. They spent $302 million on the decoys and calls in 2011 (Fueling, 2013). A hunter cannot 1 / 2 hunt without a weapon whether it is archery or a firearm. In 2011 hunters spent a total of $6 billion on guns, ammunition, and archery equipment (Fueling, 2013). Hunters are improving the American economy in these hard economic times. In 2011 hunters in America have spent 30% more on hunting than five years ago (Fueling, 2013). Another aspect of the American economy is providing  people with jobs. Hunters supply the people of America with over 680,000 jobs (25 Reasons, 2013). Those 680,000 people are able to have an income and support their family because of hunters. Hunting is a tradition passed down from generation to generation. People have been hunting since the beginning of time. The ways of hunting have changed the way life is today. Back in the time of the Native Americans they didn’t have a grocery store that they could go and get food at. The men were hunters and warriors and the women would plant gardens and take care of the village. They  depended on the men to go and kill an animal that would feed their family and tribe. These tactics have been passed down from generation to generation and has evolved immensely. Not only has the ways of hunting evolved, but also the tools used to hunt have evolved. People today still depend on hunting as a primary source of meat for their families. Hunting puts food on the table for survival. A buck that is 180 pounds that is killed will yield 72 pounds of meat (How Much, 2005). In 2012, 31,140 bucks were harvested in Michigan (Frawley, 2012). If all of those bucks weighed 180  pounds then 2,242,080 pounds of venison to feed families would have been harvested. There were a total of 418,012 harvested in Michigan in 2012 (Frawley, 2012). 418,012 deer fed families and was food on their tables. Hunting can teach many responsibilities and life lessons. The first lesson hunting can teach is how to handle a powerful weapon. In order to use a weapon to hunt, a hunter has to take a hunters safety class to learn how to use the weapon and how dangerous it is. A weapon is such a simple machine but powerful enough to take a life. A person has to respect and learn how to handle the  weapon with care and responsibility. Learning how to use the weapon can provide a person with a way to defend them if they were in harm’s way. When a person is out hunting they get to respect and observe the beauty of nature. They can view how delicate it can be but also how much strength it can hold. Hunting teaches survival skills such as how to clean the animal, how to be self-sufficient by providing yourself with a meal and pulling the trigger on an animal. Overall hunting is positive in many ways. It has been tradition since the beginning of time. There are many ways that hunting is improving and evolving. There are many more changes that can happen to make it more successful. It has many contributions to an individual, a creature, and a country. References Frawley, B. (June, 2012). Michigan deer harvest survey report 2012 seasons. Michigan Department of Natural Resources, http://www. michigan. gov/documents/dnr/ MI_Deer_Harvest_Survey_Report_2012_426213_7. pdfFueling the American economy. (2013), America’s sporting heritage, http://www. sportsmenslink. org/uploads/page/Economic%20Impact%20Report%20E-version. pdfHow much will your deer yield, (July 10, 2005). Butcher amp; Deer, http://www. butcher- packer. com/index. php?main_page=document_general_infoamp;products_id=331Hunting and wildlife conservation go hand in hand. (December 27, 2012), Department of Natural Resources, http://www. michigan. gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10370_12141-294259,00. htmlRice, D. (2011, November 1). Deer-car collisions increase this time of year. USA TODAY. http://usatoday30. usatoday. com/news/nation/story/2011-10-31/deer-car-accidents- rise/51019604/125 reasons why hunting is conservation. (2013), Rocky mountain elk foundation, htt p://www. rmef. org/Conservation/HuntingIsConservation/25ReasonsWhyHuntingIsConservation. aspx POWERED BY TCPDF (WWW. TCPDF. ORG).

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Essay --

John Keen English 101-003 Amy Borders 14 March 2014 The Media Bias That Affected the 2012 Presidential Election President Barack Obama was re-elected to a second term as President of the United States in November of 2012. When giving his acceptance speech Obama was quick to thank his wife and family, his campaign officials, the voters, and everybody that worked so hard to help him get re-elected. One group left out of this display of gratitude, and perhaps the most influential one, was the mainstream media. The media plays a huge role in how viewers formulate their opinions, which in turn become deciding factors when choosing a President. The mainstream media has a responsibility to present the candidates in an unbiased manner, so that the electorate can make a truly educated decision as to the best candidate for the office at hand. While some may argue that the media presents an unbiased view of each candidate, this is not always the case. When looking back at the 2012 Presidential election, there are several examples where the media coverage aided the candidacy of Barack Obama and hindered the candidacy of Mitt Romney. The media outlets handled the candidates very differently when came to blundering comments. For example, the media came down hard on Romney for his comment about 47% of Americans not voting for him. In a secretly recorded conversation about campaign strategy, Romney made the statement the 47% of voters are dependent upon the government, and they believe that the government should provide them with food, healthcare, jobs, housing, along with whatever else they need. He made the comment that these voters would vote for the current president â€Å"no matter what,† and he said that his job was not to worry ... ...ced a great deal of negative reporting during the 2012 Presidential election, the majority of that reporting was about insignificant matters and came during the Primary stage where he did not face any competition. Once the election became between himself and Mitt Romney, the coverage was overwhelmingly positive toward the President. Opponents argue that the criticism that President Obama received over high gas prices, the bad economy, and national health care were unjustified and presented an unbalanced attack on the Obama Campaign. Factual reporting of current events but where were they when the media was criticizing President George W. Bush? National Healthcare has been a subject of debate since the early Clinton administration In weighing the evidence both for and against a media bias in favor of Barack Obama it is important to look at a variety of evidence. Essay -- John Keen English 101-003 Amy Borders 14 March 2014 The Media Bias That Affected the 2012 Presidential Election President Barack Obama was re-elected to a second term as President of the United States in November of 2012. When giving his acceptance speech Obama was quick to thank his wife and family, his campaign officials, the voters, and everybody that worked so hard to help him get re-elected. One group left out of this display of gratitude, and perhaps the most influential one, was the mainstream media. The media plays a huge role in how viewers formulate their opinions, which in turn become deciding factors when choosing a President. The mainstream media has a responsibility to present the candidates in an unbiased manner, so that the electorate can make a truly educated decision as to the best candidate for the office at hand. While some may argue that the media presents an unbiased view of each candidate, this is not always the case. When looking back at the 2012 Presidential election, there are several examples where the media coverage aided the candidacy of Barack Obama and hindered the candidacy of Mitt Romney. The media outlets handled the candidates very differently when came to blundering comments. For example, the media came down hard on Romney for his comment about 47% of Americans not voting for him. In a secretly recorded conversation about campaign strategy, Romney made the statement the 47% of voters are dependent upon the government, and they believe that the government should provide them with food, healthcare, jobs, housing, along with whatever else they need. He made the comment that these voters would vote for the current president â€Å"no matter what,† and he said that his job was not to worry ... ...ced a great deal of negative reporting during the 2012 Presidential election, the majority of that reporting was about insignificant matters and came during the Primary stage where he did not face any competition. Once the election became between himself and Mitt Romney, the coverage was overwhelmingly positive toward the President. Opponents argue that the criticism that President Obama received over high gas prices, the bad economy, and national health care were unjustified and presented an unbalanced attack on the Obama Campaign. Factual reporting of current events but where were they when the media was criticizing President George W. Bush? National Healthcare has been a subject of debate since the early Clinton administration In weighing the evidence both for and against a media bias in favor of Barack Obama it is important to look at a variety of evidence.

Monday, January 13, 2020

PRICE and NON PRICE COMPETITION markets

An agreement made by where purchasers and Sellerss coming close contact with each other for the intent of purchasing and merchandising of goods and services straight or indirectly is described as market. Perfective Competition Monopolistic Competition Monopoly CompetitionMarketOligopoly Competition Duopoly CompetitionMonopoly MarketSingle house No replacement Monetary value shaper Downward inclining supply curve Entry barriers No competitionPerfect MarketMonetary value Homogeneous merchandises Large figure of purchasers and Sellerss Free entry and free issue Perfect cognition Perfect mobility of factors of production Absence of conveyance costDUOPLOY Market2 Sellerss Restricted entry Sellers have some market power Close replacement might be differentiated Demand curve downward sloping Equilibrium point is MR =MCOligopoly MarketFew Sellerss Homogeneous and differentiated merchandises Restricted entry Imperfect information Mutuality and changeless battle Very high monetary value snap High merchandising cost Lack of uncertainnessMONOPOLISTIC MarketLarge figure of purchasers an Sellerss Merchandise distinction Free entry High merchandising cost Two dimensions of competition Monetary value Non monetary valueDIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRICE AND NON PRICE COMPETITIONFooting NON PRICE Monetary valueMeaningMarketing scheme in which one house tries to separate its merchandise or service from viing merchandises on the footing of properties like design and craft † Selling scheme where a company tries to separate its merchandise or service from viing merchandises on the footing of low monetary value.FocusThe focal point is on quality, deign, bringing methods, locations, particular services The focal point is on lone monetary value of the merchandise.Net incomeIt is normally more profitable than selling for a lower monetary value, and avoids the hazard of a monetary value war. The company may take to stand in normal net income or normal net income.Selling CostSelling cost is high as the company pass a batch on promotional activities Selling cost is low as company focuses on monetary value factor more than promotional activities.MarketMost common among oligopolies and monopolistic competition, because houses can be highly competitory. Due to inordinate completion, a state of affairs of monetary value wars occurs in oligopolistic and monopolistic marketsExamplesShampoo Market Mobile service suppliersNON PRICE COMPETITIONApplicable to all markets except perfect & A ; monopoly market. Single purchaser in monopoly so no competition.PRICE COMPETITIONApplicable in all types of markets except monopoly market All are monetary value takers & A ; monopoly is monetary value shaper.NON PRICE COMPETITIONProduct distinction is the procedure of separating a merchandise from other merchandises in the market by adding alone characteristics like manner, quality, offers etc which makes it more attractive and superior to the mark market. The success of the merchandise distinction is more based on non monetary value factors non monetary value factors and successful distinction gives origin to monopolistic competition and sometimes to hone competition besides.There are three types of merchandise distinction:1. Simple: based on a assortment of features 2. Horizontal: based on a individual feature but consumers are non clear on quality 3. Vertical: based on a individual feature and consumers are clear on its quality3 Elementss of monetary value distinction1. Convenience- as the altering scenario client wants the merchandise every bit shortly as possible. So the house should seek to present the merchandise available on clip. 2. Customization- harmonizing to the demands of the clients the merchandise must alter in footings of sizes, colour, design, engineering etc 3. Cost recovery- this is the cost that is deserving bear downing. It doesnaa‚ ¬a„?t average really high or really low but should be sensible harmonizing to the merchandise.Non monetary value determiners of demandIncome of the consumer There is direct relation between the income of the consumer and demand for it. By and large, higher the income, higher the measure demanded and lower the income lower the measure demanded. Monetary value of the related good In instance of replacement goods, demand for a trade good falls with the autumn in the monetary value of other trade goods In instance of complementary goods, monetary value demand of a trade good rises with the autumn in the monetary value of other trade goods. Taste and penchant If the client has developed a gustatory sensation for a trade good, the demand will increase If he has no gustatory sensation and penchant for the merchandise, the demand will diminish. Seasonal factors The demand keeps on altering harmonizing to the conditions conditions. Summers will increase the demand of soft drinks whereas winter will increase the demand og woollens. Number of purchasers The demand of any merchandise depends on the figure of purchasers of the merchandise. More the purchasers demand will be high, less the figure of purchaser demand will be less. , Future outlooks If the monetary value of any trade good is expected to lift in future, clients starts purchasing prior to that and if the crowbars are expected to come down in future the client postpone his purchasing to acquire the benefit.NON PRICE DETERMINANTS OF SUPPLYInput signal monetary values As the input monetary values increases, the supply will be affected and will fall down. Technology Measure of the stuff required depends upon the engineering. Cost salvaging engineering consequences in autumn in input monetary values and therefore addition in the supply. Number of Sellerss With the addition in the figure of Sellerss, the supply besides increases with the curve switching to its right side. Expectations If the monetary values are expected to lift in future, the marketer will do unreal deficit and therefore the supply decreases.ADVANTAGES OF NON PRICE COMPETITIONThe consumers get low monetary values as the accent is non on monetary value itaa‚ ¬a„?s fundamentally on the other factors of the merchandise other than monetary value. To convey fluctuations houses keep on conveying new engineerings which result in more smoothing of the maps and add fluctuation in the merchandise. The accent is non on monetary value and hence the chief focal point is on bettering the quality and the services of the merchandise. Large figure of discrepancies leads to many picks and options for the clients in the market. There is no monetary value war in the market hence it keeps and creates a proper subject in the market which leads to smooth state of affairs. Consumers get more and more fringe benefits in footings of offers and price reductions which attract people and therefore take to competition in the market. A typical characteristic of non-price tools is that they may modify the grade of replaceability among goods.PRICE CONPETITIONPRICE EALSTICITY OF DEMANDThis step the reactivity of measure demanded of a merchandise to alterations in its ain monetary value. It allows comparing of measure demanded with pecuniary alterations It measures the alterationMarketPRICE ELASTICITYPerfect marketMonopoly marketMonopolistic marketOligopoly marketDuopoly marketIn this market the demand is elastic as the merchandises are indistinguishable in nature and are perfect replacement of each other. This market is extremely inelastic as there is 1 marketer who can do alterations in the monetary value and measure demanded consequently. Demand is comparatively elastic, with little alteration in monetary value leads to big alteration in measure demanded as all the merchandises are close replacement of each other. Demand is comparatively elastic as the merchandises are close replacement of each other. Demand is comparatively elastic as there are merely 2 Sellerss in the market and the merchandises are close replacement. For example- If the monetary value of steel and Fe additions what happens to its measure demanded.CROSS ELASTICITY OF DEMANDThe reactivity of demand for one good to a alteration in the monetary value of another ; the proportionate alteration in demand for one good divided by the proportionate alteration in the monetary value of the other.MarketCROSS ELASTICITYPerfect market Monopolistic market Duopoly market Oligopoly market Monopoly market As the merchandises are homogeneous there is a high monetary value cross snap demand. Cross piece snap is comparatively high due to competition and the figure of manufacturers in this market is high Fewer manufacturers in the market so the cross monetary value snap is low. Merchandises are close replacement, so alteration in monetary value will increase the demand of another merchandise. It has high cross snap. Merely 1 marketer in the market and therefore no replacement is available so transverse monetary value snap is non applicableADVANTAGES OF PRICE COMPETITIONPricing policy has a direct impact on the clients as pricing of any merchandise is the first observation of clients. Puting monetary values is relatively a simple undertaking as it does non necessitate fiscal and accounting records to find monetary values No market research is required which involves a high cost. So it saves cost on promotional activities as compared to non monetary value competition. Pricing straight indicates the quality and criterion of the merchandise and therefore the value of the merchandise can be estimated. Price competition divides the sections decently as it clearly points the premium and economic system category. Pricing scheme helps a batch to new participants come ining in the market to derive market portion.DecisionMonetary value and non monetary value, both have different impact on the markets. As observed in the above assignment it is seen that monopolistic market is the market state of affairs which is most influenced by both the schemes i.e. monetary value and non monetary value.This assignment is all my ain work and has non been copied in portion or in whole from any other beginning, except for any clearly marked up citation. It complies with the Instituteaa‚ ¬a„?s ordinances on Plagiarism which I have read and understood.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Germany Facts Figures (Deutschland Heute)

Germany After Reunification We have many articles devoted to Germanys history, but here we want to provide a concise summary of information and facts about contemporary Germany, its people, and its recent history since reunification, when Germanys eastern and western halves were rejoined in 1990. First a short introduction: Geography and HistoryToday Germany is the European Unions most populous nation. But Germany as a unified nation is much newer than most of its European neighbors. Germany was created in 1871 under the leadership of chancellor Otto von Bismarck after Prussia (Preußen) had conquered most of German-speaking Europe. Prior to that, Germany had been a loose association of 39 German states known as the German League (der Deutsche Bund). The German Empire (das Kaiserreich, das deutsche Reich) reached its zenith under Kaiser Wilhelm II just prior to the start of World War I (der Erste Weltkrieg) in 1914. After the War to end all wars Germany attempted to become a democratic republic, but the Weimar Republic proved to be only a short-lived prelude to the rise of Hitler and the dictatorial Third Reich of the Nazis. Following the Second World War, one man gets most of the credit for creating todays democratic Federal Republic of Germany. In 1949 Konrad Adenauer became the new Germanys first chancellor, the George Washington of West Germany. That same year also saw the birth of communist East Germany (die Deutsche Demokratische Republik) in the former Soviet Occupation Zone. For the next forty years, Germanys people and its history would be divided into an eastern and a western part. But it was not until August 1961 that a wall physically split the two Germanys. The Berlin Wall (die Mauer) and the barbed wire fence that lined the entire border between East and West Germany became a major symbol of the Cold War. By the time the Wall fell in November 1989, Germans had lived two separate national lives for four decades. Most Germans, including West German chancellor Helmut Kohl, underestimated the difficulties of reunifying people who had been divided and living under very different conditions for 40 years. Even today, more than a decade after the Walls collapse, true unification is still a goal. But once the barrier of the Wall was gone, Germans had no real choice other than reunification (die Wiedervereinigung). So what does todays Germany look like? What about its people, its government, and its influences on the world today? Here are some facts and figures. NEXT: Germany: Facts Figures The Federal Republic of Germany (die Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is Europes dominant country, both in economic power and population. Located approximately in the center of Europe, Germany is about the size of the U.S. state of Montana. Population: 82,800,000 (2000 est.) Area: 137,803 sq. mi. (356,910 sq. km), slightly smaller than Montana Bordering Countries: (from n. clockwise) Denmark, Poland, Czech Republic, Austria, Switzerland, France, Luxembourg, Belgium, Netherlands Coastline: 1,385 mi (2,389 km) - the Baltic Sea (die Ostsee) in the northeast, the North Sea (die Nordsee) in the northwest Major Cities: Berlin (capital) 3,477,900, Hamburg 1,703,800, Munich (Mà ¼nchen) 1,251,100, Cologne (Kà ¶ln) 963,300, Frankfurt 656,200 Religions: Protestant (Evangelisch) 38%, Roman Catholic (Katholisch) 34%, Muslim 1.7%, Other or non-affiliated 26.3% Government: Federal republic with a parliamentary democracy. Germanys constitution (das Grundgesetz, Basic Law) of May 23, 1949 became reunified Germanys constitution on October 3, 1990 (now a national holiday, Tag der Deutschen Einheit, German Unity Day). Legislature: There are two federal legislative bodies. The Bundestag is Germanys House of Representatives or lower house. Its members are elected to four-year terms in popular elections. The Bundesrat (Federal Council) is Germanys upper house. Its members are not elected but are the members of the 16 Là ¤nder governments or their representatives. By law the upper house must approve any law that affects the Là ¤nder. Heads of Government: The federal president (der Bundesprà ¤sident) is the titular head of state, but he/she has no real political power. He/she holds office for a five-year term and can be re-elected only once. The current federal president is Horst Kà ¶hler (since July 2004). The federal chancellor (der Bundeskanzler) is the German premier and political leader. He/she is elected by the Bundestag for a four-year term. The chancellor can also be removed by a no-confidence vote, but this is rare. Following the September 2005 elections, Angela Merkel (CDU) replaced Gerhard Schrà ¶der (SPD) as federal chancellor. In November a vote in the Bundestag made Merkel Germanys first woman chancellor (Kanzlerin). Government grand coalition negotiations for cabinet positions had also continued into November. For the results see Merkels Cabinet. Courts: The Federal Constitutional Court (das Bundesverfassungsgericht) is the highest court of the land and the guardian of the Basic Law. There are lower federal and state courts. States/Là ¤nder: Germany has 16 federal states (Bundeslà ¤nder) with governmental powers similar to those of U.S. states. West Germany had 11 Bundeslà ¤nder; the five so-called new states (die neuen Là ¤nder) were reconstituted after reunification. (East Germany had 15 districts each named for its capital city.) Monetary Unit: The euro (der Euro) replaced the Deutsche Mark when Germany joined 11 other European countries that put the euro into circulation in January 2002. See Der Euro kommt. Highest Mountain: The Zugspitze in the Bavarian Alps near the Austrian border is 9,720 ft (2,962 m) in elevation (more German geography) More About Germany: Almanac: German Mountains Almanac: German Rivers German History: History Contents Page Recent History: The Berlin Wall Money: Der Euro

Saturday, December 28, 2019

Fracking and its Effect on the Environment Essay - 1464 Words

Oil and natural gas companies have developed a way to drill for natural gas, a process called hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking. Natural gas is a flammable gas mixture consisting of methane and several other hydrocarbons that occur naturally underground. Natural gas is used as fuel for heating, cooking, and even in some automobiles like the â€Å"RideOn† buses. This technique has only recently become economically feasible with the rising prices of fossil fuels, and there is much potential for recovering natural gas through fracking. However, fracking has many waste products and unusual side effects caused by the unnatural forces and materials used. Fracking has a detrimental effect on the surrounding environment through†¦show more content†¦The added chemicals help reduce problems such as a buildup of bacteria and mineral deposits (OSU). Fracking is a very water intensive process and uses up to four million gallons of fresh water for each well, and wi th about thirty-five thousand wells in the United States, fracking consumes the same amount of water as five million people (Schmidt). Most of the water used remains trapped down in the rocks where the natural gas previously was, but about thirty to seventy percent of the water resurfaces as what is called â€Å"flowback†. Flowback water is full of minerals, salts, and often times some radioactive materials. The flowback water is stored in temporary lagoons or lakes until it is transported to facilities that treat the water or facilities that have permits to inject into deep â€Å"Class II wells† or dump into rivers, streams, and lakes along with other wastewater from other sources (OSU). Most of the facilities that are used to treat the flowback water before they are put back into water systems as treated water are not equipped to treat all the contaminants of flowback water. In all the research done, there have been no results that suggest the wastewater inside the wells contaminate or pollute groundwater that people use as drinking water. However surface spills of flowback been mostly unnoticed even though the flowback water that leaks from the storage lagoons into waterways and drinking water has potential to be especially harmful. RecentShow MoreRelatedFracking : Fracking And Its Effects On The Environment1286 Words   |  6 Pagesfracturing, commonly referred to as frac king, is a widespread practice in the United States. Fracking is a method used to extract oil and natural gas. Scientists and citizens report detrimental side effects of hydraulic drilling. New York and Vermont have banned fracking statewide. 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Although it has the potential to be a very lucrative process, presently fracking is far too detrimental to the environment, for example Southern Illinois’ Shawnee National Forest, for any environmentally conscious human being to be supportive of until there is a large change in the way the process affects the environment. Hydraulic fracturing is â€Å"the process of injecting liquid at highRead MoreThe Effects Of Fracking On The Environment1267 Words   |  6 Pagespeople arguing for the good and bad of it. This paper will examine views from both sides, its effects on the environment, review journal entries, and then show the conclusion reached about this process. The process you might have guessed that I am referring to is that of hydraulic fracturing or otherwise known as fracking by most people. First let me explain what this process involves and how it works. Fracking involves using a 99.5% sand, water, and special chemical additive to help bore through rockRead MoreThe Effects Of Fracking On The Environment Essay1782 Words   |  8 Pagesresearch paper we will cuss and discuss the effects that â€Å"Hydraulic Fracturing† has had on the environment, the economy, and human life in general. This will be essential in rationalizing the overall effects it has had on the planet Earth, and those therein. This paper will also examine how â€Å"Fracking† works, and it will bring to light the good, the bad, and the ugly. The truth about fracking is that it is quickly becoming a nightmare for both the environment and humans alike, because there aren’t enoughRead MoreThe Effects Of Fracking On The Environment And Citizens1715 Words   |  7 PagesAs Americans search for alternatives to purchasing oil and gas from overseas, the increase of fracking to extract comp ressed natural gas has risen dramatically. Remarkably, the public can only access limited research from independent scientists who list both the negative and the positive effects fracking is having on the environment and citizens’ health (Rosenberg, Phartiyal, Goldman, Branscomb, 2014, p. 75). Moreover, the American public and their elected officials are denied the chance to makeRead MoreThe Effects of Fracking on the Environment Essay913 Words   |  4 Pages While it is true â€Å"fracking†, a procedure to obtain natural gas removal from shale formations, it is also true there have been infrastructure security issues associated with this practice. Furthermore, there have been ecological considerations from fracking brought to the forefront by countless environmentalists. Indeed, hydraulic fracturing, as it is referred to, is a process by which shale gas and oil is uprooted from a depth far below the earth’s exterior. The process of extracting shale gasRe ad MoreEffects Of Fracking On The Environment And Human Health1208 Words   |  5 PagesAustralia to supply all of Australia at current levels for more than 6130 years. Fracking extracts hydrocarbons from previously inaccessible sources of oil and gas using hydraulically pressurised liquid to fracture rock and release gas trapped in coal seams (Hester, R Harrison, R). This gas was once unprofitable because it was expensive and difficult to extract. The benefits and also the side effects of fracking need to be considered including whether the economic benefits outweigh the environmentalRead MoreThe Effects Of Fracking On Environmental Impacts On The Environment1094 Words   |  5 PagesSubstantial societal concerns regarding fracking s environmental impacts have been raised. Firstly, the water requirements are significant, with an average of 20 million litres used per well. This is 50-100 times more water than in conventional natural gas extraction. An increase in fracking may exacerbate current global water stress due to pollution, climate change and population growth (Kim 2014). In addition to this, the water mixtures used in fracking contain an average of 200 000 litres ofRead MoreThe Effect Of Fracking On The United States Economy And Leaving A Harmful Footprint Behind The Environment2007 Words   |  9 Pagesthe need without ever reaching satisfaction (Erich Fromm). Introduction Fracking is a complex political topic; nonetheless, fracking is showing a positive impact on the United States economy and leaving a harmful footprint behind the environment. In addition, consumers are experiencing a significant amount of savings due to the overwhelming supplies of oil; thus, the revolution in new technology is triggering an improper fracking system that contributes to airborne pollution and water contamination

Friday, December 20, 2019

Analysis Of The Poem The Colonel By Carolyn Forche, The...

The topic of justice has been talked about by many individuals in our societies. Writers too have not been left out in telling about the same issue. All people would like fair treatment but, in our communities, we find that some individuals do not get fair justice. Authors of different genres work very hard to trying to create an understanding on the issue of justice. By use of various themes in different writing, all talking about justice, we can come up with a presentation of how justice is displayed in our society. This paper will discuss the topic of justice as presented differently in the poem â€Å"The Colonel† by Carolyn Forche, the play. â€Å"No Crime† by Billy Goda, and the story â€Å"The Lottery â€Å"by Shirley Jackson. In the poem â€Å"The Colonel† by Carolyn Forche, the narrator is acting as a witness in a case where the colonel is a victim. The theme right to justice seems to be the author’s objective for composing the poem. From the poem, the issue of justice is seen in the first sentence where the narrator says it was true since he or she was in his house. (Forche,1289). The narrator says that the colonel came with a sack having human ears and poured them on the table (Forche, 1289). The human ears show cruelty and injustice treatment of the citizens. The colonel is expected to protect his people but not mistreat them. Colonel talks arrogantly regarding the people who were likely to be the victims where he tells the narrator that â€Å"they can go fuck themselves,† (Forche,1289)